Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Energy News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



German govt. rows over nuclear revival

disclaimer: image is for illustration purposes only
by Staff Writers
Berlin (UPI) Jan 12, 2009
The German government is bickering over how many nuclear power plants it should save from closure.

When Chancellor Angela Merkel's center-right Christian Democratic Union was re-elected in a team with the pro-business Free Democratic Party in September 2009, it was widely believed that nuclear would get a quick boost.

Both parties had campaigned in favor of nuclear power, arguing that nuclear provides secure, relatively cheap CO2-free power and should remain in the mix until renewables are ready to take over.

After the parties were elected in a coalition, everyone had expected them to reverse the planned phase-out of the controversial energy source.

Decisions have not been made yet, however; Berlin has vowed to publish a new energy strategy by October, and until then, it will likely remain unsure which of the 17 remaining reactors will be saved from closure.

Experts are criticizing the delay -- three power plants are facing closure within the next months if the phase-out goes ahead as planned. Agreed in 2000 between the government and the country's utilities, they foresee all German reactors to be shut down by 2021.

"The issue needs to be dealt with quickly," Stephan Kohler, head of the German Energy Agency, or Dena, told German business daily Handelsblatt. "If the talks don't start until October, then insecurity will dominate the market until long in 2011. That's irresponsible."

An internal row is delaying the entire procedure: The Free Democrats would like to tackle the nuclear issue as quickly as possible, while the CDU wants to wait until the energy strategy is drafted.

Merkel's team says nuclear only has a future if the utilities agree to put the major part of the extra revenues from the longer running times into a fund aimed at boosting renewable energy sources and nuclear safety research.

Germany's utilities are wary of the delay, not knowing where and when to invest.

They have recently been focusing on Britain's emerging nuclear market.

Eon and RWE have decided to team up to build nuclear power plants there, promising to invest around $25 billion in the endeavor.

The new company Horizon Nuclear Power headquartered near Gloucester is held to 50 percent by Eon UK, with RWE npower owning the other half.

Duesseldorf-based Eon is one of the major public utilities in Europe and the world's largest private energy company. It employs more than 90,000 people. Essen-based RWE employs 65,000 people and is Germany's second-largest energy company.



Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
Nuclear Power News - Nuclear Science, Nuclear Technology
Powering The World in the 21st Century at Energy-Daily.com



Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


New EU foreign chief distances herself from anti-nuclear past
Brussels (AFP) Jan 11, 2010
The EU's new foreign affairs chief, Catherine Ashton, distanced herself Monday from her anti-nuclear past, as European lawmakers grilled her about her suitability for the post. "The relevance of the 1970s is not the relevance of 2010," she told deputies in Brussels. "I'm not a member of CND (Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament) and have not been a member of CND for 28 or 29 years. "I do not ... read more







The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2009 - SpaceDaily. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement